Wildlife Preservation

Goodnature® Traps are being used across the planet to preserve species threatened by invasive rat populations or secondary poison.

The A24 Automatic Rat trap plays an important role in the protection of native species. Below are just some examples of the birds and animals positively impacted by rodent control the A24 Trap provides year round.

Blue Duck

  • English Name: Blue Duck
  • Also Known As: Whio
  • Scientific Name: Hymenolaimus malacorhynchos
  • Status: Endangered
  • Habitat: New Zealand riverbanks and conservation centers
  • Threats: habitat loss, bad water quality, and stoats
  • Fun Fact: The average lifespan of a Blue Duck is 18 years.
  • Credit: Phillip Capper

The Blue Duck plumage is a mixture of blue and grey with brown markings on the front of its chest. It has light yellow eyes along with a white/pink beak. Blue Duck nests are tucked away in crevices by the riverbank where females can lay around six eggs. Blue Ducks feed off of invertebrates

The Blue Duck is native to the riverbanks of New Zealand. At first the population was widespread throughout the country, however lack of good water and vegetation has thinned and confined the population. Predators such as Stoats stop reproduction efforts by feeding on the eggs of the Ducks. While the population has plummeted, many conservation efforts are helping the Blue Ducks. For instance, the population of newborns where Stoat traps have been placed.

Ecology groups are using Goodnature™ humane trapping technology to control Rats, Mice, Stoats and other predators that eat the Blue Duck eggs and young.

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Blue Duck

 

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Brown Teal

  • English Name: Brown Teal
  • Also Known As: Pateke
  • Scientific Name: Anas chlorotis
  • Status: Endangered (population Increasing)
  • Habitat: Great barrier island and some other offshore islands
  • Threats: Cats, and ferrets, habitat loss
  • Fun Fact: The Brown Teal is nocturnal.
  • Credit: Phillip Capper

The Brown Teal was once widespread throughout New Zealand and other island, but has since been reduced to Great Barrier Island and a couple other remote islands. As the name suggests, the Brown teal is an all brown duck that measures around one and a half feet. The Brown Duck is nocturnal. During the day it resides in grass and vegetation. When the night comes, the Brown Duck forages for worms and aquatic invertebrates.

Brown Teal make nests of grass on the waterfront. Females will lay clutches with an average of six cream brown eggs. The female incubates the eggs while the male acts as a bodyguard attacking all other waterfowl that come close.

While habitat loss is a major threat to the Brown Teal, Stoats and Ferrets are an even bigger problem. Ecology groups are using Goodnature humane trapping technology to control Stoats, Ferrets, and other predators that eat the Brown Teal eggs and young.

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Kiwi

  • English Name: Kiwi
  • Scientific Name: Actinidia Deliciosa
  • Status: Threatened
  • Habitat: New Zealand forests
  • Threats: stoats and ferrets
  • Fun Fact: Female Kiwis can lay up to 100 eggs in their lifetime.
  • Credit: Glen Fergus

 

The Kiwi bird is native to new Zealand. While originally being widespread, the Kiwi is now confined to the forests of New Zealand. Kiwis are an extremely small species. They only grow to 17 inches and seven pounds at most. They eat worms, spiders and other insects. They live 8-10 years in the wild.

Kiwis lay extremely large eggs for their size. Since Kiwis are flightless, the eggs can weigh more without causing much discomfort or effort. Once the female lays the egg, the male takes over the process and incubates the egg for 75-80 days.

Stoats and ferrets are major threats to the Kiwis. Stoats alone account for over 50% of Kiwi deaths in New Zealand. Ecology groups are using Goodnature humane trapping technology to control Stoats, Ferrets and other predators that eat the Kiwi eggs and young.

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Little Penguin

  • English Name: Little Penguin
  • Scientific Name: Eudyptula minor
  • Status: Concern(population decreasing)
  • Habitat: Coasts of Australia and New Zealand
  • Threats: dogs, cats, foxes, stoats
  • Fun Fact: Little Penguins are nocturnal.
  • Credit: Public Domain Photography

 

As the name suggests, Little penguins are the smallest type of penguins weighing in at 1.2KG and growing only 32cm. The plumage of the penguin is a blueish-gray color. These penguins only live around 6-7 years in the wild but in rare cases have lived 25 years in captivity. Little penguins mostly eat small fish.

Little Penguins lay their eggs between July and September. The incubation period lasts about 36 days before the chicks are born. Little penguins take up to 8 weeks to fledge. The Penguins are an extremely curious species. Zoos have noticed that the penguins seem extremely friendly towards keepers. That’s one reason why Zoos typically show Penguin feeding as an exhibit.

Little Penguins have many predators. Some examples include Dogs, Cats, and Foxes. However, Stoats and Ferrets pose the most danger to this species.

Ecology groups are using Goodnature humane trapping technology to control Ferrets, Stoats, and other predators that eat Little Penguins.

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Little Penguin

 

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Mountain Lion

  • English Name: Mountain Lion
  • Scientific Name: Felis Concolor
  • Status: Least Concern(population decreasing)
  • Habitat: From Canada to Argentina, Texas
  • Threats: habitat loss, poaching, and poison traps
  • Fun Fact: Mountain Lions can run up to 45 km/hl.

 

The Mountain Lion is one of the largest species of cats native to America. This mammal can live up to 20 years and males can weigh almost 200 pounds. The Mountain Lion hunts Rabbits, Elk, Birds, and of course, Deer. Mountain Lions are extremely territorial animals.

Mating season typically lasts between December and March. The gestation period takes 82-96 days. Female Mountain Lions tend to have a litter every couple of years. Each litter has 2-4 kittens.

Mountain Lions don’t have many predators. The main threats to them are poaching, habitat loss and poison traps. Many traps use poison which ends up killing the wildlife. Ecology groups are using Goodnature humane trapping technology to help save Mountain Lions and other wildlife.

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Mountain Lion

 

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North Island Kākā

  • English Name: North Island Kākā
  • Also Known As: New Zealand Kākā
  • Scientific Name: Nestor meridionalis septentrionalis
  • Status: Recovering
  • Habitat: Forests of New Zealand
  • Threats: stoats and possums
  • Fun Fact: There are two subspecies of kākā in new Zealand.
  • Credit: Rosino

 

It is said that you can hear the North Island kākā before you see it. The kākā has a grey plumage with patches of red, brown and other colors. The kākā is neither small nor big measuring 18 inches, a common size for a parrot. The kākā lives in mid to high canopy. They travel in large packs of up to 100 birds. The North Island kākā eats mostly berries and invertebrates. It can also use its sharp beak to find sap and seeds from trees.

The North island kākā nests in hollow trees when reproducing. They lay 2-4 eggs per clutch. The female incubates the eggs while the male finds food for the babies. One of the biggest threats to the kākā is Sloats. Sloats prey upon the kākā eggs and young. Ecology groups are using Goodnature humane trapping technology to control Stoats, Possums, and other predators that eat the kākā eggs and young.

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North Island Kākā

 

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North Island Robin

  • English Name: North Island Robin
  • Also Known As: Toutouwai
  • Scientific Name: Petroica longipes
  • Status: Not threatened
  • Habitat: exotic forests of North Island
  • Threats: rats, stoats
  • Fun Fact: These robins start breeding at only one year old.

 

The North Island Robin is endemic to the North Island of New Zealand. It has a mostly grey plumage and white spots on the belly and above the beak. These Robins are considered not threatened. The North Island Robin is an extremely small bird. They only weigh around 23 grams. These birds are also known for being loud with their various calls. They are foragers eating Earthworms, snails, and spiders.

Robins start breeding at around one year old. The breeding season is from September to February. Eggs are incubated of clutches with two to three eggs. The female incubates for 18 days while the male helps to feed her and the newborns.

Rats and Stoats are a major threat to the North Island Robin. Ecology groups are using Goodnature humane trapping technology to control Stoats, Rats, and other predators that eat North Island Robin eggs and young.

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North Island Kākā

 

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North Island Saddleback

  • English Name: North Island Saddleback
  • Also Known As: Tīeke
  • Scientific Name: Philesturnus rufusater
  • Status: Recovering
  • Habitat: coastal and inland forests in New Zealand and other islands
  • Threats: brown rats
  • Fun Fact: North Island Saddlebacks mate for life.
  • Credit: Francesco Veronesi

 

North Island Saddlebacks are recognized easily by their red waddle. The Saddleback has a black plumage except for some chestnut patches. North Island Saddlebacks only grow to about 10 inches. The population of North Island Saddlebacks is on the recovery. There were 7000 saddlebacks worldwide when last counted.

Saddlebacks are also know for their calls. Over 200 rhythmical songs have been recorded from the North Island Saddlebacks. These birds are foragers, typically eating berries, insects, and nectar.

North Island Saddlebacks mate for life. Breeding season occurs in Spring and Summer. Artificial nesting boxes are used on some islands to help boost the population. Saddlebacks lay in clutches of up to 4. The female will incubate and brood.

Brown Rats are the main predator of North Island Saddlebacks. Ecology groups are using Goodnature humane trapping technology to control Brown Rats and other predators that eat the Kiwi eggs and young.

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North Island Saddleback

 

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Northern Bald Ibis

  • English Name: Northern Bald Ibis
  • Scientific Name: Geronticus eremita
  • Status: Recovering
  • Habitat: Coastal cliffs of Morocco and Syria
  • Threats: bBrown rats
  • Fun Fact: The Northern Bald Ibis lives 24 years in the wild.
  • Credit: dfaulder

 

The Northern Bald Ibis was once widespread through the Middle East, Europe, and Northern Africa. Now, it is confined to Morocco and a small part of Syria. The Northern Bald Ibis grows to about two and a half feet. The bird has a black plumage with streaks of purple/green on its wings. The Ibis eats lizards, beetles and bigger animals such as mice and rats.

The Northern Bald Ibis’ chooses to make their nests on the edges of tall cliffs. The Ibis mates for life and starts reproducing at three years old. They lay two to four eggs at a time. The eggs are incubated for 25 days before hatching.

One main threat to The Northern Bald Ibis is poison found in traps used to eradicate rodents and mosquitoes. Ecology groups are using Goodnature humane trapping technology to help save The Northern Bald Ibis and other wildlife.

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Owls

  • English Name: Owl
  • Scientific Name: Strigiformes
  • Status: Depends on Species, some are endangered some are least concern
  • Habitat: Everywhere except Antarctica and remote islands
  • Threats: habitat loss, vehicles, poison
  • Fun Fact: Owls are nocturnal.

 

There are over 200 breeds of Owls with most of them being nocturnal. Owls are found in almost all parts of the world except Antarctica and remote islands. Owls are fairly small only growing to at around 2 feet tall with a 1-2 foot wingspan depending on the species. They can also rotate their heads 270 degrees, which is useful for spotting prey. Owls only feed on other animals. They eat insects and lots of rodents.

Owl eggs are large and large and have a white coloring. They lay in clutches of up to 12 eggs although four is the most common number. In some species, Owls do not have one mating partner for life. They frequently mate with many other Owls.

The biggest threat to Owls is Poison. Many rodent traps use poison to kill. Once the Owl eats the rodent, it also digests the poison which kills the Owl. Ecology groups are using Goodnature humane trapping technology to help save Owls and other wildlife.

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Parson Bird

  • English Name: Parson Bird
  • Also Known As: Tui
  • Scientific Name: Prosthemadera novaeseelandiae novaeseelandiae
  • Status: Not Threatened
  • Habitat: Forests and rural gardens
  • Threats: habitat loss, possums, stoats, cats, ferrets
  • Fun Fact: The Parson Bird can mimic many sounds with great accuracy.

 

The Parson bird is a songbird endemic to New Zealand. The Parson Bird is most commonly recognized by the white tufts under its neck. The bird’s plumage is black at first sight however closer examination shows brown, blue, and green feathers. The parson bird is large for a nectar eater measuring around one foot. As mentioned earlier, the Parson Bird eats mostly nectar although it sometimes eats pollen.

The Parson bird lays its eggs from September to January. The female lays a clutch of two to four eggs. The eggs are medium sized with a light pink coloring. The female does the majority of the work for the chicks; incubation, brooding, early feeding.

Stoats and ferrets pose a major threat to the Parson Bird. Ecology groups are using Goodnature humane trapping technology to control Stoats, Ferrets, and other predators that eat the Parson Bird eggs and young.

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Parson Bird

 

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Stitchbird

  • English Name: Stitchbird
  • Also Known As: Hihi
  • Scientific Name: Notiomystis cincta
  • Status: Not Threatened
  • Habitat: Little Barrier Island
  • Threats: habitat loss, rats
  • Fun Fact: They are the only bird Species that mates face to face.
  • Credit: Francesco Veronesi

 

The Stitchbird is a medium sized songbird found naturally on Little Barrier Island. The population once was around 6,000, but is not expected to exceed 2,000 in the near future. They have a part black part grey plumage with white ear tufts. Stitchbirds also have splotches of black, yellow, and white on their wings. Stitchbirds eat Invertebrates and nectar.

The breeding season for Stitchbirds is in Spring and Summer. They build their nests high up in trees, or use artificial nesting boxes. They lay clutches of an average of three eggs. They can lay clutches 4 times per season.

Rats are a gigantic threat to the Stitchbird. Ecology groups are using Goodnature humane trapping technology to control Rats and other predators that threaten the Stitchbird.

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Takahē

  • English Name: South Island Takahē
  • Also Known As: takahē
  • Scientific Name: Porphyrio hochstetteri
  • Status: Endangered, nationally vulnerable
  • Habitat: Murchison Mountains
  • Threats: stoats and ferrets
  • Fun Fact: Takahē are known for singing.
  • Credit: Duncan Wright

 

The takahē is a flightless bird native to the Murchison Mountains of New Zealand. The takahē is an extremely colorful bird with a greenish-blue plumage and a red beak. The takahē is the largest living member of the family Rallidae. It measures 63 cm and weighs between 5-6 pounds.

The takahē lays 1-3 eggs per clutch. The survival rate for these eggs is over 75 percent. There has also been human intervention to help the takahē breed faster and raise the survival rate.

Stoats and Ferrets are the main threat to the takahē. Ecology groups are using Goodnature humane trapping technology to control Stoats, Ferrets, and other predators that eat the takahē eggs and young.

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